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Gisborne III: Book of Kings

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Those of you who follow my blog and reviews, or even just listen to me blather on Facebook or Twitter will already know of Prue Batten and how I regularly vaunt her writing. If you are new to these or need a reminder, I would say to you simply that of all the writers I know (and not just the independent ones) Prue’s writing style is the most mesmeric, flawless, silken and almost poetic. She could write up the minutes of a meeting of a county council’s session and make it sound like a ballad. So you already have an inkling of where I’m going with this review.

Prue became noted early on as a writer of fantasy – a rather unusual and intriguing fantasy world of her own creation that revolved around the mythical Faerie. These books were rather darker than many would assume when they hear the word Faerie, for Prue has given us more of a view into the kind of Fey that still dominate the folklore of the Celtic world. The sort of Faeries that steal children, play with mortals’ minds and trick and deceive. Such were the chronicles of Eirie. Needless to say, I love them and would recommend them to a fantasy reader who’s looking for something a little different, with depth and insight.

Then, in a move that came as a surprise to me, a few years ago, Prue turned her hand to the genre of Historical Fiction. Thus was born Gisborne: Book of Pawns. In very brief summary, this was the tale of a young noblewoman from Aquitaine in the 12th century, a ward of Richard Coeur de Lion, who falls in with Guy of Gisborne (yes, him. You’ve heard of him.) Essentially, a medieval tale with a strong lean towards the Romantic genre, this was a tale of betrayals and survival and with Prue’s mastery of the written word was an instant hit with me, despite not shooting for my area of interest. It was enough that I leapt at the second book immediately, when Gisborne: Book of Knights was released. Better for me, the second volume in the series took everything I liked about the first, but threw in a healthy tale of voyages, swordfights, crusades and so on. Really hit the spot, that did. If you want to see more, click here for my review of the first two books some time back.

And recently I sat watching Prue’s comments on Facebook, telling of how she was wrapping up with the third book. And I had the opportunity (lucky me) to get my hands on an advance reading copy. Well, Gisborne III is now out on Kindle, so feel free to rush off and buy your copy if you already know you want it (Amazon link here).

What can I say? Gisborne III is everything I had expected. Once more, it takes a subtle half-step away from the romantic content and a heavy ten paces into the world of troubled 12th century Europe. For those of you who have read the first two books, I will give one thing away here: Ysabel has grown up. I expect that, like me, you have torn you hair out over two books with Ysabel’s foolish tendency to mess everything up because she cannot hold herself back and leaps foolhardy into trouble at every step. Not so in this book. You will still recognise the same headstrong girl and she still has her moments of ‘ARGH!’ lack of foresight, but they are much fewer and on many occasions she now actually thinks before she acts. Additionally, old friends return (Peter, Tobias and so many more) and new interesting characters appear – one of whom made the book for me to some extent. When you read it, you’ll soon work out who that one is, I’m sure.

The plot? Well you know I don’t like to risk spoilers, but I will give you hints. Now in Venice, Ysabel has only a brief moment with Guy before he disappears off into the wide world to help his King, who has returned from the Holy land to find much of Europe set against him and is attempting to journey home through hostile lands. During his absence, Ysabel begins to suspect that she and her household are being watched by a malevolent presence. Her fears prove to be well-founded when her young son is kidnapped following a thoroughly engrossing and heart-in mouth scene. Thus begins a quest to find and rescue young William and uncover the truth behind a sinister new antagonist who seems to have at his command the small group of renegade fallen templars from the previous volume.

This is the last of the Gisborne trilogy, so expect a crescendo and a wrap up, though it appears a series of standalone spin offs, based on the supporting characters, is in the offing, so there is that to look forward to.

As always with Prue’s work, Gisborne III is a joy to read, smooth and eloquent, with a well-constructed plot weaved around well-imagined characters and, despite the grace and charm of her writing, no punches are pulled with the scenes of violence and destruction that are a necessity of a thriller, especially one set in such an era.

Bravo Prue, once again.

Go out and buy it folks.

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Written by SJAT

June 30, 2014 at 11:14 am

2 Responses

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  1. I am in the process of reading an advance copy …Simon used the word mesmeric to describe Prue’s writing…I can think of no better word than that.

    Like

    tigers68

    June 30, 2014 at 11:36 am

  2. Reblogged this on Historical Fiction reviews and commented:
    A wonderful review of a wonderful book.

    Like

    tigers68

    June 30, 2014 at 11:36 am


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