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Posts Tagged ‘gisborne

Michael by Prue Batten

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MICHAEL_Cover

Anyone who’s read my reviews over the years will know how much of a fan I am of Prue Batten’s work. She and I have known one another for a long time now, having come up together as writers from the same humble start (one shared by other great authors like Gordon Doherty and Douglas Jackson, in fact.) But throughout my career, I have always watched for Prue’s latest work and devoured it, because, in a nutshell, she writes so well that I am constantly envious of her fantastic work.

Her prose is pure class, highly descriptive, emotive and yet also as smooth as a mill pond and as beautiful and detailed as a Canaletto. She cut her teeth on dark faerie fantasy with an excellent full series – the Chronicles of Eirie – before moving on to the Medieval world with her Gisborne series, and then a trilogy of spin-offs from that concentrating on some of the more interesting supporting cast. And that is where we are now. The Triptych Chronicles (Tobias, Guillaume, and now Michael.)

I’m not going to enthuse about it here, because it will all be hyperbole. You get the gist. I will say that it easily matches all of Prue’s other work, which is to say that it is utterly magnificent. And given that I know Prue has had more than a year of real life shake-ups that must have required all her attention and distracted her from writing, it does not show, which is another mark of a true professional. Quality-wise, be assured that once you read Prue’s work, you will want to devour all her books.

The Triptych Chronicles, as I said, expand upon some of the supporting characters from her Medieval series, and this last one is a magnificent example of how to take an interesting secondary character and thrust them into the limelight with enough depth and realism to make them worthy of a series on their own. Michael was, for me, in the original series a minor character with a few interesting questions hovering over his head. This book not only answers those questions, but it gives us the whole truth and history of the character, intricately tied into a plot that is tense, gripping and ineffable. I did not eff it, I have to say. Trade wars in Constantinople form the backbone of the story, though it is Michael’s place in them and his shadowed past that create the true tale. Oh, and I also have to add that I have spent time in Istanbul and written about it myself on several occasions, and I have come across no one who can capture the feel and the spirit of the place like Prue.

This may be her last Medieval novel. I do not know. But it is a great way to go out in style, if so, and we can guarantee that there will be other great reads ahead in whatever milieu Prue chooses. Michael is released TODAY! That’s 20th July. Go buy it. And if you’ve not read any of her other books, go buy them all.

UK copies through Amazon HERE

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Written by SJAT

July 20, 2018 at 3:18 pm

Tobias

with 3 comments

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Prue Batten has long been one of my favourite writers for quality of prose. Her word-spinning ability is at the top of her craft and anything she writes is enticing and enthralling, flowing across the pages with simple grace. The fact that the more she moves into the world of medieval historical fiction the more her plots also deepen and improve just adds to the reasons to read her work.

The Gisborne trilogy started out somewhere on the border between historical fiction and historical romance, and despite that not really being my thing, I read them it and loved it because, as I’ve said before, Prue could write a phone book and make it absorbing. But with the second and third volume in that series, the focus moved more towards the traditional historical genre and the action increased along with the intrigue, all without losing anything of character or style.

Tobias is the first novel in a series of standalone spin-off novels from that series and while it retains every aspect of skill and beauty I’ve come to expect from Prue, the novel also shows once again a strengthening of plot and deepening of knowledge and centrality in the medieval world. Here’s how Tobias as a novel really wins for me in 5 points.

  1. The characters. Tobias and his brother Tomasso are two of my favourite characters from the Gisborne trilogy. They stand out as a fascinating pair and, being dwarves, there is a real depth to them, given the medieval fascination with such folk. They are written truly sympathetically and beautifully and rather than being so empathically written that their stature does not affect the tale, rather it does affect the tale as it should and the reader starts to see the world from that height, which is an amazing thing. The supporting cast are also excellent, in particular including Mehmet, who is again one of my favourite characters from the series and probably deserves a book of his own, Prue (hint, hint…)
  2. The location. In addition to the ship on which the characters travel, the cast stop at Crete, which is one of my favourite places, and the plot centres very heavily on Constantinople, where the majority of the tale takes place. And Istanbul is one of my top 2 places on Earth, with which I am very familiar. So as well as loving the settings, I could feel the heady atmosphere of the place and picture every junction, facade and doorway.
  3. The plot is beautifully crafted, like the ribbons around a maypole, each thread entwining with the others, under, over, under, over. For the plot given at the start of the book, and what drives our heroes into their long and fraught journey is only the opening salvo of what is a deep, complex and in places surprising plot, involving a clandestine business deal, a woman of great importance with enemies across Byzantium, a missing holy icon and a sinister force hunting the pair.
  4. The interaction between the two brothers. The pair may be virtually identical to others but they are very different people and the growing rift between them and the way they deal with each other in their turbulent relationship throughout is perfectly done.
  5. Atmopshere. In the Gisborne series, we have felt the cold, damp, dour atmosphere of Medieval England, the hot, dusty, dangerous atmosphere of Outremer, the glittering, cultured atmospheres of Genoa and Venice. Well now, Prue has turned her attention to that cultural melting pot that is Istanbul and the join between Europe and Asia. It is one of my favourite things to experience and I felt it oozing out from the pages, so well done there, Prue.

So there we go. I don’t think I’ve spoiled the plot for you, but if you’ve not read the Gisborne series, I heartily recommend them. If you have, you’ll LOVE Tobias. The novel can be read as a standalone if you so desire, but you’ll get a lot more from it if you’ve read the Gisborne books and have a grounding in the characters, so that’s definitely the best way to do it if you have the leisure.

Another Batten masterpiece. And it’s out today. Go get it and be entranced.

Written by SJAT

August 31, 2015 at 9:33 am

Gisborne III: Book of Kings

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Those of you who follow my blog and reviews, or even just listen to me blather on Facebook or Twitter will already know of Prue Batten and how I regularly vaunt her writing. If you are new to these or need a reminder, I would say to you simply that of all the writers I know (and not just the independent ones) Prue’s writing style is the most mesmeric, flawless, silken and almost poetic. She could write up the minutes of a meeting of a county council’s session and make it sound like a ballad. So you already have an inkling of where I’m going with this review.

Prue became noted early on as a writer of fantasy – a rather unusual and intriguing fantasy world of her own creation that revolved around the mythical Faerie. These books were rather darker than many would assume when they hear the word Faerie, for Prue has given us more of a view into the kind of Fey that still dominate the folklore of the Celtic world. The sort of Faeries that steal children, play with mortals’ minds and trick and deceive. Such were the chronicles of Eirie. Needless to say, I love them and would recommend them to a fantasy reader who’s looking for something a little different, with depth and insight.

Then, in a move that came as a surprise to me, a few years ago, Prue turned her hand to the genre of Historical Fiction. Thus was born Gisborne: Book of Pawns. In very brief summary, this was the tale of a young noblewoman from Aquitaine in the 12th century, a ward of Richard Coeur de Lion, who falls in with Guy of Gisborne (yes, him. You’ve heard of him.) Essentially, a medieval tale with a strong lean towards the Romantic genre, this was a tale of betrayals and survival and with Prue’s mastery of the written word was an instant hit with me, despite not shooting for my area of interest. It was enough that I leapt at the second book immediately, when Gisborne: Book of Knights was released. Better for me, the second volume in the series took everything I liked about the first, but threw in a healthy tale of voyages, swordfights, crusades and so on. Really hit the spot, that did. If you want to see more, click here for my review of the first two books some time back.

And recently I sat watching Prue’s comments on Facebook, telling of how she was wrapping up with the third book. And I had the opportunity (lucky me) to get my hands on an advance reading copy. Well, Gisborne III is now out on Kindle, so feel free to rush off and buy your copy if you already know you want it (Amazon link here).

What can I say? Gisborne III is everything I had expected. Once more, it takes a subtle half-step away from the romantic content and a heavy ten paces into the world of troubled 12th century Europe. For those of you who have read the first two books, I will give one thing away here: Ysabel has grown up. I expect that, like me, you have torn you hair out over two books with Ysabel’s foolish tendency to mess everything up because she cannot hold herself back and leaps foolhardy into trouble at every step. Not so in this book. You will still recognise the same headstrong girl and she still has her moments of ‘ARGH!’ lack of foresight, but they are much fewer and on many occasions she now actually thinks before she acts. Additionally, old friends return (Peter, Tobias and so many more) and new interesting characters appear – one of whom made the book for me to some extent. When you read it, you’ll soon work out who that one is, I’m sure.

The plot? Well you know I don’t like to risk spoilers, but I will give you hints. Now in Venice, Ysabel has only a brief moment with Guy before he disappears off into the wide world to help his King, who has returned from the Holy land to find much of Europe set against him and is attempting to journey home through hostile lands. During his absence, Ysabel begins to suspect that she and her household are being watched by a malevolent presence. Her fears prove to be well-founded when her young son is kidnapped following a thoroughly engrossing and heart-in mouth scene. Thus begins a quest to find and rescue young William and uncover the truth behind a sinister new antagonist who seems to have at his command the small group of renegade fallen templars from the previous volume.

This is the last of the Gisborne trilogy, so expect a crescendo and a wrap up, though it appears a series of standalone spin offs, based on the supporting characters, is in the offing, so there is that to look forward to.

As always with Prue’s work, Gisborne III is a joy to read, smooth and eloquent, with a well-constructed plot weaved around well-imagined characters and, despite the grace and charm of her writing, no punches are pulled with the scenes of violence and destruction that are a necessity of a thriller, especially one set in such an era.

Bravo Prue, once again.

Go out and buy it folks.

Written by SJAT

June 30, 2014 at 11:14 am