S.J.A. Turney's Books & More

Reviews, news and inside the world of books.

Posts Tagged ‘Persian

Marathon (Long War 2)

leave a comment »

{86816526-B0FD-4365-ABCD-E47336D5FDF5}Img100

How does a writer possibly follow the scale and originality of a book like Killer of Men? Well, follow me through this review, and I’ll explain how.

The first book of the Long War told of how Arimnestos became a Killer of Men. Through hard labour, unexpected fights, slavery, piracy and brutal war, the young Plataean became a great hero and killer whose name alone made Greeks and Persians quake. But while those events changed Arimnestos the man, they did not change his path. For at the end of them, he returned to his home and to his forge, gave up all the trappings of heroism and war and became a simple blacksmith once more.

Marathon, while a continuation of the tale, is a whole different story. Marathon is the story of how events changed the life and the path of Arimnestos of Plataea.

Our hero has settled in his ancient home. He is a man of name and property. His former comrades live and work nearby, but they still itch for war and glory. Not so, Arimnestos. He is content. But events will never conspire to leave him in peace. No. Soon, our friend finds himself heading to Athens, where he is dragged into legal difficulties and heads out to secure the forgiveness of Gods to clear himself of any shame or impropriety.

And so begins his next stage of the Long War. Rushing hither and thither in ships, saving cities, fighting hopeless sea battles, making new friends and re-acquainting himself with old enemies, Arimnestos soon leaves behind the life of a quiet smith and becomes the great Miltiades’ favourite war dog once more.

But things are about to change. For what started as the Ionian revolt in the previous book is about to explode. As the Great King of Persia’s most vicious satrap begins to move against Greece to chastise them for their involvement, the Greeks find themselves hard pressed and pushed back.

A survivor of one of the worst disasters of the war, Arimnestos returns home only to find old enemies still at work there. He is wed and tries once more to carve out a life in Plataea, but the world will not let him rest. Athens is under threat, and Plataea owes Athens its support. Elected as the military leader for Plataea, Arimnestos joins old friends and new (and even a few enemies) in a great bid to defy Persia – the greatest single power in the world. Persia is coming for Athens. And the focus of their meeting point will be the fields of Marathon.

What happens in this book will finally make it clear to Arimnestos that he can no more settle into life as a village smith than a duck could hunt an eagle. War is in his blood and the troubles of the world will leave him with nothing but the need to exercise his great abilities.

Enough of ruining the plot for you.

There is a terrible danger for any writer in tackling a famous battle. I’ve done it myself with Alesia. Ben Kane has done so time and again in his works. Few people can do a great battle justice. And let’s face it, Marathon is one of the greats. In fact, I’d bet money that if any layperson in the street were asked to name a Greek battle, the few who could would name Marathon.

And while this story is about far more than Marathon, that great battle is the climax. And it is treated in a MASTERFUL way. Cameron has hit the sweet spot in this series where he can carry in his story the hubris, glory and almost mythical bravery of ancient Greek warfare. There are elements of the Iliad in here, it is that authentic. But despite that he is able to also make the reader aware of the base level of that war throughout, giving a realistic grounding to the scenes. The hero may be godlike and leaping from wall to wall with shining spearpoint, a hero in every way. But the ground beneath him squelches with blood and filth and shattered bone and crying boys and widows. It is a gift as a writer to be able to carry off such a combination. It is what makes his battle scenes both glorious and horrific in equal measure.

The final scenes in this book will leave you exhausted.

Arimnestos, the Killer of Men, has led you through one of the darkest hours in Greek history in this second volume. Where will he go next? Check out tomorrow’s review…

Advertisements

Written by SJAT

August 10, 2015 at 10:04 am

Killer of Men (Long War 1)

with 2 comments

kom

To begin at the beginning… How many series have you read where you pick up the first book to find an iron-hard, three-dimensional, experienced and world-weary hero awaiting you? They are, barring the anti-hero, the best characters to both read and write. But how often do you get to see that hero created?

That is what Killer of Men is. In terms of superhero movies, this is a great hero’s ‘origin story’. It is the very creation of a hero. Or possibly not quite a hero. After all, an instinctive killer, drawn to war like iron filings to a magnet is not by definition the same as a hero.

Moreover, the book is set during one of the greatest clashes of culture in the history of the world: Greece vs. Persia. But again, in the same way as the novel is the story of the origin of the hero, it is also the story of the origin of that war (it is called the Long War saga for a reason. This was a loooooong war.) And that means that Killer of Men takes place during the Ionian revolt at the very beginning of the great Greek/Persian war.

So what of the actual story?

Arimnestos is an ordinary boy. He is the son of a talented blacksmith who has also had the honour and duty of standing as a hoplite in the line of battle for his small city-state of Plataea. As his city is inevitably dragged into the world stage via a perhaps unwise allegiance with the upcoming demos of Athens, Arimnestos begins a journey of his own. In sickening blurb terms, one might say: from zero to hero.

Sent from his family to study with a retired warrior, Arimnestos learns the skills of the soldier and the hunter, but despite that, not yet the ‘killer of men’ for which the book is named. As the wheel of time turns and he grows to young manhood, the Plataean finds himself in battle against the greatest warriors of his age, the Spartans, on the Athenian flank. Following the battle and a betrayal by one of his own, Arimnestos finds himself alone, with a dead father and brother and sold into slavery.

But here his journey really begins. As a slave (and companion to a young noble) in Ephesus, Arimnestos learns from one of the greatest philosophers of the ancient world, improves his battle skills and is introduced on a very personal level to the Persian people and their leaders.

Well, I won’t spoil the story. But Arimnestos has been a blacksmith’s son, a soldier, and then a slave. He will also be a ship’s navarch, a sportsman, a war-hero, an avenger, and so much more as he succumbs to fate and becomes the killer of men that is his destiny. But throughout the whole tale of his growth to manhood, there is always the background thread that Arimnestos was betrayed, disinherited and sold as a slave. And we know from early in the book that this situation will have to be resolved before the end.

Well that’s the book and the plot and the hero. As for the style? Is anyone not familiar yet with Christian Cameron’s fluid and absorbing work? He writes masterpieces or nothing at all.

In technical terms, while my own knowledge of the world of ancient Greece is much scanter than my knowledge of Rome, I have yet to trip him up with any fact, and he has taught me so much through his writing. He knows his subject thoroughly. He is conversant to an undreamed of extent. Moreover, Cameron is both a reenactor and a military veteran, both of which lend a huge level of authenticity to his scenes of strife. And I mean to a level that few civilians could ever hope to touch.

Cameron is, for me, a composite of all I like in my ancient novels. He can write the stink, terror and chaos of battle as well as Ben Kane, the cameraderie and humour like Tony Riches, the depth of character and inrigue like Douglas Jacskon and the sheer emotion like Manda Scott. As such, he is capable of producing work that speaks to readers of all forms of historical fiction, to every facet of a reader’s soul.

Killer of Men is the saga of a young man driven to the edge of reason and finding in his darkest hour the clarity of the born warrior. It is a tale of growth and of finding oneself, and of revenge and heroism. It is everything you could want in historical fiction.

I cannot recommend the Long War series highly enough. Check in tommorrow for a review on book 2: Marathon.